Honey - Steve's Bees

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Steve's Bees
Honey

Liquid Honey
Liquid HONEY

Liquid Honey comes in many different flavours and colours. It all depends on what the Bees themselves have been foraging on. It can range in colour from nearly clear to an almost black.


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Liquid Honey
Soft Set Honey
Soft Set HONEY

This is what Beekeepers used to call Creamed Honey before the European Union decided that as there wasn’t any cream in it, it couldn’t be called Creamed Honey.
All Honey granulates (goes solid). It is caused by the ratio of the sugars Glucose and Fructose contained in the Honey. The more Glucose in the Honey the faster it granulates. We can reverse the process by gently heating the honey to about 35°C at which point the Honey starts to liquify. As Beekeepers we can continue warming until the Honey has returned to a Liquid state, or in the case of the Soft Set Honey it is allowed to only partially liquefy and it is then vigorously mixed. The act of mixing breaks down the large granulation into small crystals. This gives the Honey a soft buttery texture. Ideal for spreading on toast.


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Soft Set Honey
Heather Honey
Heather HONEY


Bee Hives are taken up to the heather moors in August traditionally around the Glorious 12th, though mine generally go up at the end of July and are left up on the moors until the middle to end of September dependent on the weather.
Heather Honey is the only pure honey my Bees produce.  All the other Honey I produce is a mix of whatever the Bees can find to collect nectar from. Heather Honey is different in that where I take my Bees 99% of all the forage that the Bees can find is Heather. Thus ensuring an almost pure harvest.
Heather Honey is different from other Honey in that has a far stronger taste and it has a gelatinous consistency.


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Heather Honey
Section Honey
Section HONEY

Section Honey is small sections of comb within some form of container that has been placed in the hive by the Beekeeper for the Bees to Draw out and fill with Honey. Sections take a variety of forms, I produce a combination of the traditional 4½ inch square sections and the more modern round sections. I don't produce a lot of this type of Honey but what I do sells very fast.
These are probably one of the hardest forms of saleable Honey that a Beekeeper produces. I can place a box of thirty two wooden sections onto a hive only to find that three or four are of saleable quality when I come to collect it at the end of the season.
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Section Honey
There are two questions that I am frequently asked about my Honey.
  • Is our Honey "Raw"
  • Is our Honey "Organic"
To both of these questions I have to say "I don't know" and we actually refuse to mislead our customers in calling our Honey Raw and Organic. Why do I say this. Well here are the reasons:

Raw Honey

As a Beekeeper selling Honey I have to abide by the Honey Regulations 2015. In the regulations there are a number of definitions of Honey, I can only sell Honey using these definitions, and Raw is not one of them. I therefore legally cannot call my Honey "Raw".
When I talk to customers who want raw honey I ask them what they think raw honey is and they always say that it is unfiltered and unheated honey. The problem with unfiltered Honey is that unless you want honey that is filled with dead bees, bits of wax and other debris we have to filter it. Honey has to be heated as well. As beekeepers we store it in buckets until we are ready to bottle it. In that time the Honey will have granulated to something of the consistency of Concrete. So here at Steve's Bees like all other Beekeepers in the country I can say that yes we do filter and heat our honey, but we follow best pratice in only filtering and heating as necessary to remove unwanted debris and to heat the honey so it can be bottled.

Organic Honey

In the UK it is very very difficult to get Organic Honey. Yes there are lots of people out there selling Organic Honey but I would strongly dispute that it is Organic. The word Organic is a legal definition. Farmers who are organic have to of had their farming methods proven to be organic and ratified by the Soil Association. As a Beekeeper to be able to say that my Honey is Organic then my Bees would have to of foraged on purely organic land. Bees will forage over an area of approximately 30 square mile. So I would have to prove that every field, hedgerow, road verge and garden in that area was being cultivated organically. I would have to do this by obtaining the appropriate paperwork from the relevant land owners. Obviously an impossible task. So If you see organic honey for sale ask the vendor to prove.
Our Products
Honey
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Contact Us
Telephone:
07769 660133

Email:
sales@steves-bees.co.uk

Address:
34 Junction Road
Norton
Stockton on Tees
TS20 1PL
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